Smarts goal

Long term goals, like wanting to be healthy and happy are often the most meaningful to us, and often take the longest to achieve. Your goal can be achievable if you follow the SMARTS process to establishing them. Breaking them down into smaller steps and cultivating motivation can also be a key factor for success.

In this article, we show you how to just that, along with some detailed examples to inspire you.

If you are already familiar with SMARTS goals, here is a handy template you can use to create your goals, break them down and keep yourself motivated.

What is a smarts goal?

Whatever your goals are, following the SMARTS method is an effective technique to helping you achieve them.

SMARTS is an acronym you can follow for setting your goals. To help make your goals clear and achievable, your goals should be:

 S - Specific, significant, stretching

M - Measurable, meaningful, motivational

A - Achievable, attainable, , agreed upon, acceptable, action-oriented

R - Relevant, realistic, reasonable, rewarding, results-oriented

T - Time-based, time-bound, timely, tangible, can you track it?

S – Shared with someone

How do I create a smarts goal?

For each of these, consider the following:

Specific:

Your goal should be clear and focused so that you feel motivated to achieve it.

Start by stating what you want to achieve, be as be as specific as possible. Consider:

  • What do I want to accomplish?
  • Why is this goal important?
  • Who is involved?
  • Where is it located?
  • Which resources or limits are involved?
  • What skills and experience are necessary to understand/become/do/learn/achieve your goal?

Example:

I would like to learn how to meditate by joining the same meditation class in Welwyn Garden City that my sister goes to.

Measurable

Your goal would be more achievable if you are able to track your progress and define when you will have achieved your goal.

Consider:

  • How much?
  • How many?
  • How will I know when it is accomplished?

Example:

I would like to learn how to meditate by going to one meditation session a week with my sister in Welwyn Garden City

Achievable

Your goal should be achievable to keep you motivated and feeling fulfilled. Think about:

  • How can I accomplish this goal?
  • How realistic is the goal?
  • What constraints do I have to overcome first?
  • Will other people be able to help?
  • What existing qualifications/achievements/skills/knowledge do I have?
  • How much power do I have to achieve the goals?
  • When would I be able to do what is necessary to achieve the goal

Example:

I would like to learn how to meditate by going to one meditation session a week with my sister in Welwyn Garden City. I will take X bus at 5:45pm on Tuesdays after work so that I can meet my sister there before the start at 6:30pm. My sister will be able to drive me home.

Relevant

Is this goal relevant and realistic, does it fit in with your other goals?

  • Does this seem worthwhile?
  • Is this the right time?
  • Does this match other efforts/needs?
  • Am I the right person to reach this goal?
  • Is it applicable in the current environment?
  • What impact will this have on other areas of my life?

Examples:

I would like to learn how to meditate by going to one meditation session a week with my sister in Welwyn Garden City. I will take X bus at 5:45pm on Tuesdays after work so that I can meet my sister there before the start at 6:30pm. My sister has offered to drive me home afterwards.

Time-bound

Setting a goal that has a target date makes the goal more likely to be achieved. Consider:

  • When can I achieve this by?
  • What’s the smallest step I can take to make a start?
  • What can I do today? Next Week, next month?
  • What can I do six weeks from now?
  • What can I do six months from now?

Examples:

I would like to learn how to meditate by going to one meditation session a week with my sister in Welwyn Garden City. I will take X bus at 5:45pm on Tuesdays after work so that I can meet my sister there before the start at 6:30pm. My sister has offered to drive me home afterwards. I can start the class tomorrow and will feel successful if I attend at least two sessions a month for the first three months, and one session a week in 6 months’ time.

Shared

Sharing your goal with someone else increases your chances of success. This is because they can offer you encouragement as well as be someone to hold you accountable by asking you about your progress. Think about who you would trust to support your goals as well as challenge you to help you succeed. 

Hope 

Opportunity 

Control